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Full text of "Yearbook"

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THOMPSON 
ACADEMY 




THE DOCK 1868 



1814 - 1975 



DEDICATION 



I- 




JOHN DECIUS PINTO 



The dedication of the 1975 Thompson Academy Yearbook was one of the most difficult 
tasks facing the Senior Class and the Yearbook staff this year. It is very special yearbook 
because it is the last one Thompson will publish. We, in turn, wanted the dedication to be 
special. 

The choice was not an easy one. There are many people on the island who have helped 
us immeasurably during our stay here. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have served the school and 
its students for a total of 89 years. They have always been helpful and friendly, especially 
when we needed it the most. Mr. and Mrs. Baxter have totaled 37 years of service to the 
school and students. They have displayed the same quality as the Thomases. 

John Horan has many times gone out of his way to help a troubled young man, giving 
time and effort and never seeking any repayment. John Quinn has worked endless hours 
trying to solidify our plans for after graduation. Doug Paige has shown us a patience and 
understanding that is rare in a man as young as he is. 

Perhaps the one person who best exemplifies our stay at Thompson is our Headmaster, 
JOHN DECIUS PINTO. To him we dedicate the 1974 Thompson Academy Yearbook. 

Mr. Pinto has served as Math Teacher, Physics Teacher, Yearbook Advisor, Math 
Department Head, Golf Coach, Director of Studies, and finally Headmaster. He has worn 
many hats at Thompson, but the one he wears best is understanding. In the years that he 
has been associated with us, John Pinto has never failed with us individually or in a group 
he has never lost his posture. 

For seven years he has given unselfishly of himself and his family. The Yearbook 
Dedication is small thanks, but it is the best the Class of 1975 has to give. 



SCHOOL HISTORY 



Thompson Academy is the fifth oldest independent school for boys in New England. The academy was founded in 1814 as the 
Boston Asylum for Indigent Boys, principally to afford "protection and support" to the sons of local families that had suffered 
from conditions brought about by the War of 1812, and were therefore unable to supply proper guidance or support to their pre-or 
early adolescent sons. 

A number of philanthropic Bostonians decided early in 1813 to establish a "home school" for such boys to provide them with 
food, shelter, education and direction. Descendants of many of the orginal funding families remain active members of the 
Thompson Academy Board of Trustees. 

In 1832, a second, similarly oriented school was independently incorporated as the Boston Farm School, and Thompson's 
Island Boston Harbor was purchased from the city of Dorchester for its setting. 

Because the objectives of the Boston Farm School were much alike, and because the living facilities of the Asylum were 
becoming increasingly crowded in its single brick building in Boston's West End, a joint petition was presented to the General 
Court of Massachusetts for an act uniting the two schools into one, the Boston Asylum and Farm School for Indigent Boys. 

The Assets of the former Asylum School were liquidated, and thus, a solid financial base upon which the new school would 
establish its future growth was provided. The new school continued to serve needy boys of good character and to provide a 
year-round home, academic instruction, and a thorough appreciation of manual and industrial arts and the principals of 
agriculture. 

During the 19th century the school enlarged its campus, its combined academic/agricultural/vocational program and its 
student body and staff. In 1907, the school name was changed to the Farm and Trades School, however, the school's orientation 
and program remained unchanged. 

One of the most distinctive extracurricular activities of the early Farm and Trades School had its inception in 1857. According 
to school historian Raymond W. Stanley, some 12 boys were casulally amusing themselves one afternoon creating musical 
sounds through combs covered with tissue paper. They were soon joined by three boys with violins, and this group of 15 began 
to schedule informal meetings on a regular basis. In THE FOUR THOMPSONS, Stanley writes: "A bass violin, saxhorn, 
cornopean, and drum were added to form the nucleus of what became, the same year, the first school band in America." The 
Greek philosopher Plato suggested in the REPUBLIC that musical instruction for young people would inpart to them an 
important sense of rhythm and harmony to broaden and to supplement a classical education. It was the boys of the early Farm 
and Trades School, however, that were to finally implement this platonic concept. 

In 1956, The Farm and Trades School on Thompson's Island was renamed Thompson Academy, a titular change which both 
formalized and reflected a process of evolution that the school had been undergoing for some fifty years. The Farm and Trades 
School, as it name implied, has provided a practical training program which according to a 1947 school brochure, developed: 

" in each boy considerable skill in several of the departments of practical training with intensive training in one or two 

departments. These practical departments included printing, sloyd, carpentry, heating engineering, painting, glazing, electrical 
repairs, plumbing and steam repairs, cement work, floor care, building maintenance, farming, lawn care, shrubbery, tree 
pruning, shoe repair, laundry operation, clothing care, baking, vegetable canning, butchering, meat cutting, poultry dressing, 
office and messenger work." 

Additionally, each student was required to complete a full curriculum of academic instruction. Typical school days included 
four hours of class work, four hours of work training, and four hours of play and recreation. Although demanding, the success of 
that vigorous program is yet addested to by hundreds of enthusiastic alumni. 

By 1955, however, the Trustees of the School had determined that a disproportionately large number of then recent graduates 
had left the farm and shops on Thompson Island only to find that their elective but somewhat obsolite skills were not so easily 
marketable as they has been in an earlier era. At that time, the Board of Trustees elected to change the name of the School to 
Thompson Academy, to extend the program to include the full four years of high school, to both modify and intensify the 
academic curriculum, and insofar as was possible to continue to introduce each boy to a variety of practical, manual skills. 

The formula has been tremendously successful. The farm program ended in 1963 as a result of a disastrous fire which 
destroyed the main barn, much of the industrial arts courses-glazing, printing, vegetable canning, poultry dressing, ect. were 
also terminated because of lack of training facilities and diminishing student interest. Yet, even as the academic curriculm 
became more and more geared to college preparation, Thompson Academy has continued to emphasize the importance of 
well-roundedness and manual skill development. 

Again in 1971 fire struck the island. This time it was the Main building that was completely destroyed. To help put the school 
back on its feet a Planning Committee was formed to look into new education enviroments that could be implemented on the 
island. 






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I: 



THOMPSON FRIENDS 
AND FAMILIES 



This June marks the end of an era. Thompson Academy will close its doors as a residential boarding 
school to begin a bold new educational venture in the fall. For those of us who have been associated with 
the old school this is a time to pause and reflect on the history and traditions of the past one hundred 
sixty one years. 

We shall miss the old school and all that it stood for; but times change and so must Thompson Academy. 
We shall miss the old school and all its good works, and we wish for those who follow us great success 
and continuing good fortune. 

John D. Pinto 
, Headmaster 

Thompson Academy 




Amelia Pinto (V2 year) 

Patrick Pinto (2 years) 

Sarah Pinto (5 years) 

Paula Pinto (7 years) 

John D. Pinto (8 years); Columbia, B.A., Boston University, University of Rhode Island, and Honeywell 

Computer Institute. 

HEADMASTER 




Mr. Raymond Thomas (45 years): 

Assistant Headmaster, Wood- 
working. 

Mrs. Wilhelmenia B. Thomas (44 years): 

Secretary to the Headmaster. 



Mr. Charles Baxter (23 years): 

Purchasing Agent and Business 

Manager. 
Mrs. Mildred Baxter (14 years): 

Records Secretary. 



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Alan Willis (7 years): 

Director of Studies, Head of 

Science Dept., JV Basketball 

Coach, Biology, Math. 

Acadia University, B. Sc, U Mass. 
CeliaWillis(2years): 

University, B.A. 
Samantha(2years): 

Doggie U. 



John A. Robinson (2 years): 

Athletic Director, Head of Math 
Dept., Head Football and Basket- 
ball Coach, Math, History, Year- 
book Advisor. 
Rutgers University, B.A. 

Margaret L. Robinson (2 years): 
Librarian 

Adelphi University, B.A., New 
York Universisty. 

Christopher R. Robinson ( 1 year): 
Son 

Taxi (2 years): 

Dog 

Macduff (2 years): 

Cat (Not pictured, probably out 
stalking a rat.) 





Peter Weiss (3 years): Boat Captain, Chemistry. University of Maine, B.S. 
Ann Weiss (2 years): Switchboard Operator, Science. University of Maine, B.S. 
Pepper (2 years): Dog 




Ronald Dumont (2 years): Alternate Boat Captain, Science, Math. U Mass, B.S. 
Mary Elizabeth Dumont (1 year) 




Thomas Klinepeter(2 years): 
Head Chef 

Diane Klinepeter (2 years) : 
Alternate 
Switchboard 
Operator 

Christine Klinepeter (2 years): 
Daughter 



Phyllis Champagne (31 years): 
Housekeeper 




10 




Annette Roberge (9 years) : 

Admissions Secretary 



Yvonne Zollman (2 years) : 

Art, Math, Yoga, Theater. 
Ohio State University, B.A. 




11 




Mary Joan Willard (2 years): 

Guidance, English 
Indiana University of Pa., B.A. 
State University, Albany, N.Y., M.A. 
Boston University 



Beverly Darkins(1 year): 

Planning Office Secretary 




12 




Ralph Lindsey (26 years): 

Infimary Director 
Calvin Collidge Col- 
lege, B.A., M.Ed. 



William James (11 years): 

Power Plant Operator 




13 




Alphonse Grincavich (8 years): 
Groundsman 



Ben Brown (11 years): 

Power Plant Operator 




14 




*l- 







John Horan (9 years) : 

Head Basketball Coach, 
Gym Supervisor 





Gerald Jordan (4 years): 

Grounds Fore- 
man 

Essex County 
Agricultural 
College, B.S. 




15 




Rene Jacques St. Pierre (5 years) : 
Chef Extraordinaire 



John Quinn (3 years): 

Director of 

Guidance, His- 
tory, English, 
Soccer Coach. 
University of 
Rhode Island, 
B.A., M.A. 




16 




Douglas Paige (3 years) : 

Head of History Dept., History, Hockey 

Coach. 

Lehigh University, B.A., 

Boston University, M.Ed. 



William Peck (3 years) : 

Director of Admissions, Head of English 
Dept., English, Head Soccer Coach. 
Yale University, B.A., 
Middlebury College 




17 




Robert Sullivan (2 years): 

English, History, Hockey Coach, Head 
Baseball Coach. 
Boston University, B.A. 



William Nelson (1 year): 

Reading, English 
Penn State, B.S.S. 
Boston University, M.A. 




18 




Alan November (1 year): 

Math, Science, Aquariam Program 
U Mass., B.S. 



David Schaufus(1 year): 

Kitchen Assistant 




19 



PLANNING OFFICE 



\ 




Frank White and Donald Lonnbardi 



/ 



20 





David Handy: 

Head Dorm Counselor, New Dorm 
1st Floor 
Boston University 



Harry Fenton: 

"B" Dorm 

Bunker Hill Community College 






Joseph Cronin: 

New Dorm 2nd Floor 



George Toppi: 



"C" Dorm 



21 



CLUBS AND DORMS 



Classes and activities play a large role in the lives of some Thompson students. Other 
students don't even know some of our activities exist. We have class instruction for credit 
in art and woodworking. The rest of the activities are scheduled on a regular basis as part 
of the evening program. 

Tournaments are held in cribbage (partners and singles) and chess with a fine trophy 
going to the winners. Theater work shop is working on an avant garde play, and the art 
club regularly has exhibits in the dining hall. Weightlifting, though not as popular as in 
years past, has been refurbished with two new universal machines. Yoga is the new 
physical fitness fad on campus. 

Of course without the boat boys we could never get on or off the island, and the help 
they give struggling faculty wives with their packages is certainly appreciated. 

The dorms are total zoos, but fun places to live in. Any stranger who enters New Dorm 
after dark, takes his life in his own hands. The Loyal Sons of St. Patrick rarely show mercy. 
The opening of "0" Dorm has brought a recreation room with an air hockey game and a 
Coke machine. All "B" Dorm has to offer is the now defunct "doghouse" and Igor Quinn, 
Taxi's best friend next to the green truck. 

Some people's membership in the clubs on the following pages is somewhat suspect. 
However, we accept all comers, living or dead!!! 



/• 



AFRO-AM SOCIETY 




FIRST ROW: Stanley Kiano, George Rosado, Steve Scott, Gregory Carroll, and Eddie Neal. 
SECOND ROW: Robert Taylor, George Delvalle, Karlton Burnett, and James Montgomery. THIRD 
ROW: Carmello Rivera, Juan Coday, Jonathan King, and Tyrone Haskett. 



22 



CRIBBAGE 



, .J.. -.,, .„„.j 




FIRST ROW: Joe Watts, Eddie Neal, Brian Feeney, and Gene Sullivan. SECOND ROW; Joe 
Stappen, Steve Scott, Ed Downs, and Billy Donald. THIRD ROW: Tim Buckley, Mike Prentis, and 
Eddie Milan. 



CHESS 




FIRST ROW: Jim Doane, Karlton Burnett, and Jim Devine. SECOND ROW: Robert Taylor, Greg 
Bullocck, and Steve Scott. 



23 



THEATER 



\ 




SITTING: Yvonne Zollman. FIRSTROW: Chill Wills, Joe Delahandro, and Wally Brunner. SECOND 
ROW: Sidney Potier.huntz Hall, and Kip Kieno. THIRD ROW: Leo Gor.cy, Lassie, and Dagwood. 



ART 




FIRST ROW: Gregory Carroll, Papa Carter, Walter Logue, and Ed Milan. SECOND ROW: Jim 
Doane, Eddie Neal, James Devine, and Tom Herlihy. THIRD ROW: Karlton Burnett and Yvonne 
Zollman. 



24 



WEIGHTLIFTING 




FIRST ROW: Joe Watts, Joe Stappen, Papa Carter, and Eddie Neal. SECOND ROW: Gene Sullivan, Jon 
King, Steve Scott, Ed Downs, Frank Tkacik, and Doug Marr. (If you really believe that all these clowns actually 
lift, then I know of an old bridge down New York City Way that I could pick up for you for a song.) 



YOGA 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Papa Carter, Paul Ryan, Tom McClure, Yvonne Zollman, Joe Watts, Brian Feeney, Gene 
Sullivan, and Buddha. 



25 



WOODWORKING 



\ 




FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Steve Murphy, Eddie Ruck, Two Unrecognizable Faces, Tom Roonie, Mike 
Prentis, Joe Shahbaz, Papa Carter, Frank Tkacik, Juan Coday, Paul Ryan, Tim Buckley, and Mr. 
Thomas. 



11 ^n 



C" DORM 




FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Bev Darkins, George Rosado, Tyrone Hasket, George Delvalle, (Jarmeiio 
Rivera, Eddie Neal, Karlton Burnett, Juan Coday, Absolutely Devine, and Steve Scott. 



26 



ATHLETICS 



Athletics play a large role in the life of a Thompson Acadenny student. During any one of the sports 
seasons more than 50% of the student body can be found competing on an interscholastic varsity 
level. Though small is numbers, we have always held our own against schools four and five times our 
size. We are the smallest school in New England to field an eleven man varsity level football team. 

Although this was not one of our banner years for victory, a proud sports tradition will end with the 
closing of the program in June of 1975. The Fall was a struggle in football and soccer, but the Winter 
improved with hockey and the basketball team won the second division Class D in the Bay State 
Tournament. The Spring looks even brighter with the return of a veteran baseball team. 

In this small space we would like to honor our captains ; Brian Feeney, Doug Marr, and Jon King in 
football, Dave Rose and Wayne Gerrish in Soccer, John Nee and Steve Scott in Varsity Basketball, 
Tim Buckley and Wally Logue in JV Basketball, and Larry Bavis in Baseball. We would also like to 
thank our coaches John Robinson, Dave Handy, Bill Peck, John Quinn, John "Injun" Horan, Doug 
Paige, Alan Willis and Bob Sullivan for jobs well done. 

A special thanks goes out to Ray Thomas who started our athletic program 45 years ago, and who 
served as Athletic Director for the first 42 years. Thank you, Mr. T. 




29 



SOCCER 



V 




FIRST ROW: Coach William Peck, Stanley Kiano, Juan Coday, David Rose 
(Co-capt.), Wayne Gerrish (Co-capt.), Calvin Reed, and Coach John Quinn. 
SECOND ROW: Thomas Herlihy, Edward Milan, Paul Ryan, Stephen Joyce, David 
Norris, Jose Serrano, Daryll Payne, Gregory Bullock, Thomas Rozene, Stephen 
Murphy, Carmello Rivera, Kevin Boyce, and Timothy Doucette. 



The 1974 Soccer team, captained by Dave Rose and Wayne Gerrish, finished a 
disappointing season with a close contest against Winchendon-Cusing. A large 
home-coming crowd cheered them on, but a goal late in the game for W-C sent the 
Seahawks down to a 2-1 defeat. Dave Rose was a standout in goal and Wayne Gerrish on 
defense kept the game close throughout. 

Although many games were hotly contested, the only victory Thompson could manage 
was a 10-1 thrashing of perenially weak New Preparatory School. A previous game with 
New Prep had been cancelled and the Thompson players were anxious to break into the 
win column. For once the offense was in high gear, resulting in a lopsided score. 

Outwardly, the statistics don't point to the 1974 season as a successful one, but often It 
was the play of the offensive players like Jose Serrano, Steve Scott, and Juan Coday that 
gave Thompson Academy fans something to be happy about. Calvin Reed and Steve Joyce 
were strong on defense and only a lack of a consistent offense kept Thompson from 
winning more games. 

Thanks for an enjoyable year go to Ron Dumont for his help as a volunteer coach, to 
newcomers Rich Quinn and Tim Doucette for their spark and hustle, and especially to MVP 
David Rose and defensive leader Wayne Gerrish for holding the team together through a 
difficult season. 



30 




T.A. 

T.A. 2 

T.A. 1 

T.A. 2 

T.A. 

T.A. 

T.A. 3 

T.A. 2 

T.A. 10 

T.A. 1 



1974 SCORES 
Proctor 
Beaver 



Marianapolis 



4 



Concord Academy 4 



St. Andrew's 



Lawrence Academy 6 



8 



Lexington Christian 6 



Belmont HillJV's 



New Prep 

Winchendon-Cushing 2 



Dave Rose moves in on the ball as Daryll Payne 
assists. 




Richie Quinn, Ed Donovan, and Wayne Gerrish watch as Steve Joyce heads the ball away from our goal. 



31 




/*■ 



i 



Wif^f^ - * 



% 



Bullock Saves! 




Juan Coday on the move. 




Jose Serrano w/ith a head. 




^'r wK^^^ 



Eddie Donovan lays into one. 



32 



FOOTBALL 




FIRST ROW: Mark Prentis, James Montgomery, Joseph Stappen, Brian Feeney, Douglas Marr, Jonathan 
King, Brian Rudy, Mike Prentis, and Robert Taylor. SECOND ROW: George Delvalle, James Delvalle, Edward 
Downs, Timothy Buckley, Russell Smith, Edward Joyce, John Nee, and Tyrone Haskett. THIRD ROW: Coach 
John Robinson, John Feeney, Dave Marr, Brian Lee, Brian McDonough, and Paul Watts. Absent when pictures 
was taken : Ass't Coach David Handy, George Rosado, and Hecotr Carter. 



It was a difficult year for the young Seahawks. After a well-deserved 12-8 victory over Proctor in our 
opener, the team was hit with a number of calamities. Injuries, players leaving school, and playing 
against post-graduate-laden teams could not keep us down. However, our record ended up 1-8. 

The highlight of the season had to be the win over Proctor, but many other people and events stand 
out. We were able to play pretty much a two platoon system with only three seniors starting on 
offense and four on defense. We would have been strong for a long time. 

Against Hebron we fielded a defense that averaged 1 52 lbs. a man. TA held Hebron to 7 yds. on the 
ground and 84 in the air but came up short 22-8. We ourselves had over 200 yds. total offense, but 
fumbles prevented us from scoring on several occasions. 

In nine games we out gained our opponents in five, but fumbles, key penalties, missed 
assignments, and the like stalled many scoring drives. The defense had to play as much as 70% of the 
game on certain days. Thompson never quit, and week after week we came out hitting. Joe Stappen 
and Brian Rudy were the examples of what we had. They never stopped hitting or hustling. 

Russell Smith at tackle, Robert Taylor at linebacker, Jon King at fullback, and Brian Rudy at 
cornerback made first team All Yankee Prep Conference. Brian Feeney and Doug Marr were honorable 
mention. 

Jonathan King was selected as a Scholastic All-Amerian, the first from Thompson Academy. 

So, though it was a difficult year, it was also in many respects a rewarding one. The players learned 
to never quit and gained the respect of all their opponents with their desire. 



33 



V 



T.A. 12 

T.A. 8 

T.A. 6 

T.A. 



Proctor 



8 



North Yarmouth 35 



Cranwell 



Hyde 



20 



33 



974 SCORES 






T.A. 


6 


Lawrence 


T.A. 


8 


Hebron 


T.A. 


14 


St. Sebasti 


T.A. 





Tyngsboro 



T.A. 



Winchendon-Cushing 18 



20 



22 



8 





Jon King sets up for 
pass protection. 



Brian Rudy knifes for the extra points against St. Sebastian's after Ed 
Downs and Tim Buckley have cleared the way. 




34 



FIRST OFFENSE 




DOWN : Mark Prentis, Robert Taylor, Ed Downs, Tim Buckley, Russ Smith, Tyrone Haskett, and Mike Prentis. 
STANDING: Brian Rudy, Doug Marr, Jon King, Brian Feeney, Joey Stappen, and Teddy Joyce. 



FIRST DEFENSE 




DOWN: Jack Feeney, Brian McDonough, Paul Watts, Russ Smith, and Dave Marr. STANDING: 
Jim Delvalle, Jim Motgomery, Robert Taylor, Doug Marr, John Nee, and Brian Feeney. 



Brian Lee, 



35 



\ 




Doug Marr, Robert Taylor, and Brian Feeney nnove in to stop a Cranwell runner. 




X 




ilili 






4 



Russell Smith pulls out to lead John King around the end. 



36 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 




FIRST ROW: Mike McG.raih, George Rosado, John Nee, Steve Scott, and Larry Bavis. 
SECOND ROW: Mike Prentis, Mark Prentis, Herb Smith, and Tim Buckley. Absent when 
picture was taken : Robert Taylor. 



The 1974-75 Thompson Academy Varsity team finished the campaign with an 8-4 record. However, 
they came away winners in post season play, as the Seahawl< club took top honors in Class D, 
Division 2, of the Bay State Tournament. 

The victories in the tournament were typical of Thompson play throughout the regular season. 
Balanced scoring and rebounding, along with a relentless team defense led us into the winners's 
circle. In the final, Robert Tayor, and Steve Scott provided the scoring in the early going as John Nee 
and Herbie Smith controlled the boards. In the fourth quarter, when they were needed, Mike Prentis 
and Mike McGrath came off the bench to nail down the win. McGrath sunk four consecutive foul shots 
in clutch situations to break the rally of Tahantaho's up, and Prentis regained control on the boards. 

During the season we were able to put together two strings of three consecutive victories. We 
knocked off St. Andrew's who went to the New England Private School Tournament, and almost 
dumped Hyde (losing only 57-55 in their gym), who came in second in the New England Private School 
Tournament. 

Larry Bavis, George Rosado, and Tim Buckley provided consistent play throughout the year. These 
players were part of our starting ten that proved the theory that winning basketball, is a team game 
played by more than five men. We would like to thank our coaches John Robinson and John "Injun" 
Horan for their leadership and time. John Horan finished out his ninth year of coaching at Thompson 
with a combined JV and Varsity record of 11 5-43. 



37 



\ 









1974-75 SCORES 








T.A. 


51 


Roxbury Latin 


35 


T.A. 


76 


Beaver 


80 


T.A. 


55 


Hyde School 


57 


T.A. 


61 


Lexington Christian 


39 


T.A. 


35 


St. Sebastian's 


66 


T.A. 


33 


Tabor 


70 


T.A. 


57 


St. Andrew's 


56 


T.A. 


79 


Cambridge School 


46 


T.A. 


76 


New Prep 


50 


T.A. 


74 


Commonwealth 


34 


T.A. 


67 


Chapel Hill 


40 


T.A. 


66 


T.A. Alumni 


62 



BAY STATE TOURNAMENT 



T.A. 75 



St. Joseph's (Lowell) 53 



T.A. 62 



Tahantaho Regional (Boylston) 58 




Mike Prentis and Steve Scott regroup during a break in the action. 



Mike Prentis and Steve Scott await the ball after a Herb Smith block. 




38 




An anxious bench and cheering section looks on. 



Herb Smith and John Nee await a rebound. 





Robert Taylor and Steve Scott 
start the fast break. 



39 



JV BASKETBALL 




Coach Alan Willis, Walter Logue, Timothy Buckley, Skip Burns, Daryll Payne, Greg 
Bullock, Jose Serrano, Tyrone Haskett, and Richie Wuinn. Absent when the picture was 
taken Kevin Boyce. 

1974-75 SCORES 



T.A. 


44 


Roxbury Latin 


23 


T.A. 


45 


Belmont Hill 


35 


T.A. 


53 . 


Hyde 


55 


T.A. 


38 


St. Sebastian's 


37 


T.A. 


41 


So. Boston Boys C 


lub 45 



T.A. 


43 


Tynan 


36 


T.A. 


40 


Lexington Christian 


39 


T.A. 


55 


St. Andrew's 


33 


T.A. 


44 


Tynan 


28 


T.A. 


96 


Hill Girls School 


14 



Coach Alan Willis and his young Seahawks had a fine 8-2 record this winter. 
The highlight of the season was a 38-37 come from behind win over St. 
Sebastian's. Also not to be forgotten quickly was the devastating 96-14 
stomping administered to Hill Girls School. 

On the more serious side, the team did enjoy a very successful campaign. It 
was led by Tim Buckley who was the leading scorer and rebounder, and who 
almost single-handedly brought home the win versus St. Sebastian's. The 
supporting cast differed from game to game, but the hustle of Wally Logue, 
Greg Bullock, and Skip Burns was always evident. 

For Coach Al Willis it was another very strong effort as he extended his eight 
year won-loss record as JV coach to an astounding 88-14. 



Co-captains Wally Logue and 
Tim Buckley. 




40 



HOCKEY 




FIRSTROW: Tom McClure, Joe Stappen, Gene Sullivan, Tom Herlihy, and Ed Milan. SECOND ROW: Frank 
Tkacik, Doug Marr, Bill Donald, and Coach Dougie Paige. THIRD ROW: Joe Watts, Joe Lee, and Don 
McGuire. Absent when picture was taken : Brian McDonough, Brian Lee, and Coach Bob Sullivan. 



1974-75 SCORES 



T.A. 5 
T.A. 6 
T.A. 2 



So. Boston Penguins 4 



Gavin School 



Boston College High 4 



T.A. 4 
T.A. 2 
T.A. 4 



So. Boston Seals 



IVIemorial JV's 



So. Boston Penguins 6 



The 1974-75 Thompson Academy hockey team began the season with high hopes. After losing only 
three of last years starters, the returning letterman were joined by some good, new hockey talent. 
Coaches Paige and Sullivan were concerned about the defense, but the addition of Ed "Butch" Milan 
and Bill "Spaceman" Donald strengthened the existing line of Don McGuire and Tom McClure, 
Meanwhile, Frank Tkacik took over the net-minding duties and was effective enough to win the Most 
Improved Player Award. 

The Sullivan-Stappen scoring punch of last year was backed up by a line with Brian Lee centering 
Joe Lee and Brian McDonough. With these tow units working well together, the Sehawks started off 
the season with a 5-4 win over the Penguins, a South Boston Midget League team. Unfortunately, 
before the year progressed too far, the team was hurt by the losses of Brian Lee and Brian 
McDonough. With other losses in personnell it looked like the team might have to cancel the rest of 
the season, but the remaining players hustled and worked their way to a respectable 4-2 record. 
Although the roster was small, the spirit of the team was high, and the season was a fun, enjoyable 
experience for both the players and coaches. 



41 



\ 




Milan, McClure, and McGuire converge as Frank Tkacik turns away a South Boston Penguin bid for a score. 




Action in front of the net as Tkacik stymies Memorial 
JV's. 




The action turns down ice. 



42 



BASEBALL 




(At press time the baseball team had not even started practice, and consequently a picture of the 
team was not available. In its place we are putting a picture with caption of the 1934 Varsity 
Basketball team) 

FIRST ROW: Dole, Delorie, and Bean. SECOND ROW: Coach Thomas, Magee, Picard, MacDonald, 
and Pierce. 



The 1975 Thompson Academy Baseball team could be one of the strongest representatives in recent 
years. Although most of last year's lettermen have departed, most first year students bring with them the 
reputation of being excellent ballplayers in the local Parks and Recreation League. The pitching staff 
consists of returning lettermen Gino Sullivan and John Nee. They will be bolstered with the addition of 
new comers Larry Bavis and Jerry Morancy. There is a three way battle for the catching spot between Tim 
Buckley, Teddy Joyce, and Joey Lee. Other players vying for a spot on the starting nine are George 
Rosado, Eddie Downs, Eddie Neal, Bobby Tracy, Mike McGrath, Garmello Rivera, Joe Watts, and Randy 
King. 

Scheduled home games are against New Prep (2), Lexington Ghristian, Roxbury Latin, St. Sebastian's, 
and Lawrence Academy. The school wishes the team the best of luck in the upcoming season. 



43 



SPORTS FROM THE PAST 



K 



rHE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL. THOMPSON'S ISLAN 

BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 













Varsity Football 1940 








„w A ' ■; 



Varsity Football 1941 




Early single wing action in 1920. 



44 



FRESHMEN 




FIRST ROW: Tom Rooney, Pat Carter, Joe Lee, and Eddie Ruck. SECOND ROW: Jim Devine, 
Karlton Burnett, George Delvalle, and Paul Ryan. Absent when picture was taken: Louis Burns, Rich 
Carter, Jim Doane, Tim Doucette, Jose Joyner, Alphonso Kellam, Randy King, Mark Powell, Richie 
Quinn, and Louis Williams. 



SOPHOMORE 




FIRST ROW: Mark Coucette, Joe Watts, and Bill Donald. SECOND ROW: Greg Bullock, Joe 
Shahbaz, and Steve Murphy. Absent when picture was taken: Kevin Boyce, Alan Davis, Brian 
McDonough, Daryll Payne, Joe Perry, and Jose Serrano. 



45 



JUNIORS 



K 




FIRST ROW: Mike McGrath, Paul Capeless, Ed Milan, Walter Logue, Gene Sullivan, Jerry Morancy, 
and Ed Downs. SECOND ROW: Mike Prentis, Tyrone Haskett, Ted Joyce, Don McGuire, Herb 
Smith, and John Nee. THIRD ROW: Tinn Buckley, Tom Herlihy, Dennis Arena, Bobby Tracy, Dennis 
Manning, and Frank Tkacik. Absent when picture was taken: James Elwell, Mike Flaherty, Peter 
Meeken, Carmello Rivera, Cavon Ross, and Russell Smith. 



CLASS OF 1942 





FIRST ROW: James St. Couer, William Mara, Donald Davis, 
Francis Daniel, and Robert Dooling. SECOND ROW: Franklyn 
Harris, Robert Stone, Alan Stewart, David Haeger, James Trembly, 
William Bernard, and Mark Risser. THIRD ROW: Geroge Zevitas, 
George Hardy, Ernest Burns, Walter Johansson, Wallace Folkins, 
William Britton, and William Etheridge. 



46 



SENIORS 




FIRST ROW: James Montgomery, Doug Marr, Stanley Kiano, Eddie Neal, Tom McClure, Joe Stappen, and Larry 
Bavis. SECOND ROW: Robert Taylor, Steve Powell, Wayne Gerrish, George Rosado, Brian Feeney, and Gregory 
Carroll. THIRD ROW: Jonathan King, Steve Scott, Juan Coday, and Mark Prentis. Absent when picture was 
taken: Archie Clayotr, Ed Donovan, Calvin Reed, David Rose, and Brian Rudy. 



By the time these words are read in final copy, the Class of 1975 will have joined the ranks of the 
Alunnni. Perhaps it is the last class to do so. Seven of the graduating Seniors have spent four years 
here at Thompson. They are Archie Claytor, Steve Scott, Doug Marr, Brian Feeney, David Rose, 
Wayne Gerrish, and Tom McClure. 

What has gone on in those four years? John D. Pinto became the school's twelfth Headmaster. The 
Pilgrim IV went into service. The dock was completely rebuilt over a three year peroid. The yurt was 
built. Livestock (cows, sheep, rabbits, geese, and goats) returned to the island for the first time in 12 
years. These are just some of the highlights. 

Why then are the seniors facing backwards in the above picture? They are looking back over their 
years here and this what they see. As freshman a T.A. senior would remember Fred Creed as the Boat 
Captain. They would remember John Delvalle ruled the roost. J.K. Parker terrorized the dorms. 

As sophomores the memory of Mr. Kitching's passing remains. Who could forget Fat Scott and 
Hiram Thompson doing their "Cheech and Chong" imitation. Was there anybody who could not hear 
CBS from anywhere on campus. The heart breaking loss to Rockport in the Bay State Tournament was 
perhaps the most remembered event to the year. 

Who could ever forget the arrival of Koums as the junior year began. How about Bob Bandera 
showing all he was worth? And the Great Telephone Caper where Ma Bell was truly ripped off? 
Remember Rock Adams holding the Gym up one night at midnight? And Bob Casey did a good job. 

Now as seniors the memories are fresher. South Boston arrived. Outward Bound week. School 
meetings. The eight oclock meeting. The Bay State Tournament Win. Mad Dog. Mahoney. Danforth. 
Nicoletti. Cunniff. The food at Thompson. And finally the crulest thought of all, the closing of 
Thompson Academy. 



47 



LAWRENCE BAVIS 



K 



559 East 4th St. 
So. Boston, Mass. 
Nickname: Bona 
College: Lyndon's University 
Occupation: Undecided 
Entered Senior Class 1974 





Likes: All sports, Heineken, Schlitz, Southie, 

and XYZ Society. 
Dislikes: New York City, forced busing, T.A.'s 

new gestapo tactics, and Tom's food. 
T.A. Biography: Basketball 4, Baseball 4. 



Epitaph: "No dumping allowed" 



48 



GREGORY CARROLL 



115-17 East 119th St. 
New York, N.Y. 
Nickname: All Jive 
College: BethuneCookman 
Occupation: Undecided 
Entered Junior Class 1973 





Likes: Myself, youth, blackness, intelligence, 

fine women, and not forgetting the 

Bethals and Hamlettes who are special to 

me. 

Dislikes: Majority of the unmentionables from 

South Boston, Tom's cooking, and 

TC's breath. 

T.A. Biography: Art 3,4, Theater 3,4, Intra- 

murals3,4, LaCrosse3. 



Epitaph: ***** 



49 



V 



ARCHIE CLAYTOR 



97 RurthersSt. 

Roxbury, Mass. 

Nicknames: Clay, Junkie C, Pimp 

College: Brandeis 

Occupation: Player 

Entered Sophomore Class 1971 





Likes: Valerie, Valeria, Superfly rides, cash, 

money, 12:00 p.m. and the ghetto, 

people who are real, and reading pimp 

books. 

Dislikes: False loyality, crazy roommates, not 

being able to sleep after two o'clock 

class, Sunday night at 7:30 or 10:00, 

inconsiderate people, and imitation 

eggs. 

T.A. Biography: Intramurals 2,3,4, Yearbook 

Staff 4. 



Epitaph: "Jimi hendrix lived and died, like him 
I'll never die." 



50 



JUAN CODAY 



2833 Gunther Ave. 
Bronx, N.Y. 
Nickname: Cody 
College: U Mass Amherst 
Occupation: Dentist 
Entered Junior Class 1973 





Likes: Yvonne, Ron, Mary Beth, Boston, money 

girls, soccer, cars, and the boat. 

Dislikes: Tom's rotten murder burgers and 

deadly mystery meat, Southie, and 

walking up to Tom's leather pancakes. 

T.A. Biography: Soccer 3,4, La Crosse 3, Boat 

Boy 3,4, Yoga 4 



Epitaph : "Self education makes great men." 



51 



EDWARD DONOVAN 



V 



158 Waterson Ave. 
Quincy, Mass. 
Nickname: Edzo 
College: None 
Ocupation: Coast Guard 
Entered Senior Class 1974 





Likes: Wayne Gerrish as "Mr. C.C", Power's 
car, parties in Doug's room, women like 
Karen, drinking on Friday nights, and 
beating Mike Nee at ping-pong. 
Dislikes: Wayne's Smelly feet, T.A. lousy food, 
dorm jobs, Eddie Neal's mouth, All Jive, 
eight o'clock meetings, Jerry Jordan, 
getting shut down at a packy, and 
getting busted. 
T.A. Biography: Soccer 4, Hockey 4, Weight- 
lifting 4. 



Epitaph: "Give me a hit, will ya." 



52 



BRIAN FEENEY 



One Ross Place 

So. Boston, Mass. 

Nickname: Mr. Excitement 

College: Undecided 

Occupation : President of the United States 

Entered Freshman Class in 1971 





? if^- •■'m ^ 







Likes: Ye Olde Towne Tavern, roast beef 
dinners, making raids on the gym with 
Gino, beer, and XYZ Society. 

Dislikes: Green teeth, busing, and A. B.C. 

T.A. Biography: Football 1,2,3,4, (Co-capt.) 4, 

Basketball 1,2,3, Baseball 1,2, 
3,4, A Distinguished American 
High School Student, Who's 
Who in American High 
Schools, Yearbook Staff, Stud- 
ent Advisory Committee, Hon- 
or Roll 1,2,3, and the M.J. 
Willard Fan Club (President). 



Epitaph : "Here lies Brian, what a dear. Here lies Brian with a case of beer. 



53 



\ 



WAYNE GERRISH 



133 Beach St. 

Hull, Mass. 

Nicknames: Herb, Terrorizer, The Train. 

College: Suffolk 

Occupation: Businessman 

Entered Freshman Class 1971 




\ 



If 







y 




Likes: History, math, getting drunk, soccer, 

listening to Mr. Quinn talk about Nixon 

and the CIA, racism, the Mahoneys, and 

rum and rootbeer. 

Dislikes: Mr. Robinson's jokes, TA's food, 

school in general. All Jive, Blinky, 

Being called C.C, Jerry Jordan, 

slaving, water fights, and roommates. 

T.A. Biography: Basketball 1, Baseball 1,2, 

Soccer 2,3,4, Hockey mgr. 3, 
Weightlifting 4, Honor Roll 
2,3,4, Best Defense Award 
Soccer 4. 



Epitaph : "Here lies the best man 
the world ever knew. 



54 



STANLEY KIANO 



P.O. Box 40125 
Nairobi, Kenya 

Nicknames: Stan, Doc, Africa 
College: Undecided 
Occupation: Undecided 
Entered Senior Class 1974 





Likes: Sleeping, twelve noon, dinner, Mr. 
Paige's history class. Science, Ron, 
Yvonne asking me questions, my jokes 
with Igor, going on a trip, and the Fenney 
brothers. 
Dislikes: Weekends, being alone in my room, 
being homesick, Ed Downs pouring 
water on me, and being teased. 
T. A. Biography : Soccer 4, Yoga 4, Art 4, Theater 
4, Boat Boy 4. 



"Angel Gabriel 
written, so I 
everybody. 



knows 
don't 



what 
have 



will be 
to tell 



55 



'\ 



JONATHAN T. KING 



699 Lily Pond Rd. 
Albany, Georgia 
Nickname: Bud 
College: Morehouse 
Occupation: Real Estate Broker 
Entered Junior Class 1973 





Likes: Listening to heavy music, traveling to 

places I haven't been, going out and 

checking out what's to check out, and 

arguing with some people. 

Dislikes: Having to eat obnoxious food four 

days of the week, leaving the nice 

Southern climate to come north this to 

this screwed up climate, and waiting 

patiently for the boat. 

T.A. Biography: Football 3,4, (Co-capt.) 4, 

Who's Who Among American 
High School Students, A 
Distinguished American High 
School Student, and Football 
Ail-American (High School) 



Epitaph: None 



56 



DOUGLAS JUDE MARR 



438 Jeruselem Road 

Cohasset, Mass. 

Nickname: Doug 

College: Suffolk 

Occupation: Wealthy businessnnan 

Entered Freshman Class 1971 





Likes: Budweiser, My Moms and Pops, Fanny 

fox, Seagrams V.O., football, Ralph, my 

dog Thor, Pandora's Box, foxxy women, 

hoken and poken, 75 Fleetwood 

Brougham's, my handkerchief, and 

Wayne as C.C. 

Dislikes: Schlitz, Santa Clause, All Jive, Ron 

Dumont and his followers, Eddie 

Neal's BIG mouth, Ed Donovan's tee shirt, 

Wayne's smelly feet, jungle boogies, 

eight o'clock meetings, TA food, dirty 

jokes, and farmers. 

T.A. Biography: Baseball 1,2, Football 1,2,3,4, 

co-capt.. Hockey 1,2,3,4, TA 

Drinking Team 3,4, Intramural 

All Stars 3,4, Theater 3,4. 



Dougie as a Freshman. 



Epitaph: "Here rests a fine scholar who helped Improve his country just by living 
there and he should have been a crozier." 



57 



THOMAS McCLURE 



9 Jenkins St. 

So. Boston, Mass. 

Nicknames: Seahawk, Superscore 

College: None 

Occupation: Service 

Entered Freshman Class 1971 





Likes: Denise, hockey, history, reading books, 
Southie, Perkins Schoolyard, football, 
Jezo, Annette, Mrs. T., and Mr. B. 
Dislikes: Posey, Roxbury, Harlem, cats, Alan, 
Tom's cooking, messy rooms, dirty 
people, and losing in hockey. 
T.A. Biography: Hockey 1,2,3,4, LaCrosse 2,3, 
Weightlifting 2,3, Theater 3,4, 
Yoga 3,4. 




Epitaph: "I thought we would never get rid of him." 



58 



JAMES MONTGOMERY 



131 West 117th St. 

New York, N.Y. 

Nickname: Jim Dandy 

College: BethuneCookman 

Occupation: Intellectual Businessman Con Man 

Entered Junior Class 1973 





Likes: Big legit money, Candy Clavery, 
intellectual fine black women, a huge 
estate, to be very deafed up, properous 
education, hanging out, and an 
understanding relationship. 
Dislikes: Ignorant South Boston freaks, having 
no gapper. South Boston itself, 
yougly girls, and waiting for the boat. 
T.A. Biography: Football 4, JV Basketball 3, 
LaCrosse 3, Theater 3,4. 



Epitaph : "Ignorant people and women are the most difficult people to get along with in this world and in 
any other." 



59 



EDWARD LYNWOOD NEAL 



X 



8 Fidelis Way 

Brighton, Mass. 

Nicknames: Ed, Supersly, The Infamous 

Alais Abraxas II, Mr. Lips. 
College: U Mass, Amherst 
Occupation: Business Unlimited 
Entered Sophmore Class 1972 





'^m 




Likes: Power, money, love, wisdom, intelli- 
gence, alias Segundo Diablo Abraxas, 
1972 Dodge Charger, some forms of 
craziness, seeing Gregory Carroll act a 
fool, leaving South Boston, Mass. ZIP 
02127. 
Dislikes: South Boston, Mass. 02127, waiting 
for things, what the call food at TA, 
pushers, addicts, loansharks, Cadil- 
lics, uncomprehendable trig classes, 
dirty bathrooms, Jerry Jordan's dry 
jokes, the lack of intelligence in the 
faces of Doug Marr and Eddie 
Donovan. 
T.A. Biography: Football 3, Basketball 2, 

Baseball 4, LaCrosse 3, Art 3,4, 
Theater 3,4, Karate 3, Yoga 3,4. 



Epitaph: "No Comment." 



60 



STEPHEN POWELL 



32 Morrison St. 
Medfors, Mass. 
Nickname: Steve 
College: None 
Occupation: Undecided 
Entered Sophomore Class 1972 





Lil<es: Friday afternoons, being with my 
girlfriend, talking on the phone. Mad Dog 
as a roommate, and catching the buzz. 

Dislikes: Sunday nights, being broke, classes 
and TA food. 

T.A. Biography: Has been here off and on for 
three years. Isn't that enough? 



Epitaph : "His buzz has run out." 



61 



MARK PRENTIS 



V 



592 East 4th St. 
So. Boston, Mass. 
Nickname: Mark 
College: BHCC 
Occupation: Policeman 
Entered Junior Class 1973 





Likes: XYZ meetings, birds and bones, H and 

5th, basketball, football, Al Willis taking 

over class, girls, money, TA Drinking 

Team, Polo Team, and Toboggan Team. 

Dislikes: DSt., Eddie Neal's mouth, Stanley from 

deep dark Africa, Patty Posey, Alan, 

November, and Monk sticking up for 

DSt. 

T.A. Biogrpahy: Football 4, Basketball 4, Polo 

Team, 5,6, Drinking Team 3,4. 



Epitaph: "Help!" 



62 



CALVIN REED 



Drewsville, New Hampshire 
Nickname: Dutch Boy, Mr. Peanut 
College: Undecided 
Occupation: Boat Captain 
Entered Freshman Class 1971 





Likes: History, sports, girls, parties, music, 
long hair, sleep, my mother, and the 
boat. 
Dislikes: Homework, getting up for breakfast, 
being broke, long boring weeks, 
mid-terms, and trig. 
T.A. Biogrpahy: Basketball 1,2,3 Soccer 1,2, 
3,4, Baseball 1, Boat Boy 1,2, 
3,4, Theater 3,4. 



Epitaph: "No Comment." 



63 



V 



GEORGE ROSADO 



140 Columbia St. 
New York, N.Y. 
Nickname: None 
College: Fordham 
Occupation: Undecided 
Entered Senior Class 1974 





Likes: Basketball, football, baseball, most of 
the teachers, and Mr. Robinson as a 
coach. 
Dislikes: Morning meetings and some of the 

wise guys from South Boston. 
T.A. Biogrpahy: Football 4, Basketball 4, Base- 
ball 4. 



Epitaph : "He that is wise by day is no fool by night." 



64 



DAVID ROSE 



102 Alexander St. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Nickname: Dave the Rave 
College: Undecided 
Occupation: Undecided 
Entered Freshman Class 1971 



' .,-? 11 1-^"^ "\ 






Likes: Toki, trig, history, and money. 

Dislikes: Kevin Boyces, knots on the forehead, 

and Russell's country talk. 
T.A. Biography: Soccer 1,2,3,4, Co-Capt 4, 

Basketball 1,2,3, LaCrosse 
1 ,2,3, Theater 3,4, Yoga 3,4. 



■m 




Epitaph : "Dead or alive, Dave Rose was a great man." 



65 



X 



BRIAN RUDY 



240 Adams St. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Nickname: Hammer 
College: Northeastern 
Occupation: Coach 
Entered Senior Class 1974 





Likes: Anne, travel drinking, and football. 

Dislikes: TAfood. 

T.A. Biography: Football 4, Weightlifting 4. 



1 
JUL, 



Epitaph 



**************** 



66 



STEPHEN SCOTT 



154 Walnut Ave. 
Roxbury, Mass. 
Nicknames: Skizzmo, Skizz. 
College: Holy Cross 
Occupation: Intellectual Player 
Entered Freshman Class 1971 



' .v#v'**'i%;',.VrV- - 





Likes: Women, parties, money, long vacations, 

Beverly, and basketball season. 
Dislikes: Robert's dry jokes, Greggs dragon 
breath, goobers. Peck's boring Eng- 
lish classes, Bullock's goofiness, and 
dirty bathrooms. 
T.A. Biography: Football 1,2, Soccer 3,4, 
Basketball 1 ,2,3,4, (co-capt.) 4, 
LaCrosse 1,2,3. 



Epitaph: None 



67 



'v 



JOSEPH STAPPEN 



76 West Broadway 

So. Boston, Mass. 

Nickname: JoJo 

College: Bryant and Stratton 

Occupation: Computer Operator 

Entered Sophomore Class 1972 





Likes: Louise, hockey, football, Southie, The 
Exorcist, Ralph Nader, Elton John, 
summer, dynamite girls, #23, short- 
handed goals, a winning season, and P 
P Streets. 
Dislikes: The President, dentention, missing 
boat, pot, Youngblood, All Jive, CIA, 
forced busing, and friends trying to 
act superior. 
T.A. Biography: Football 4, Hockey 2,3,4, 

Theater 3, TA Drinking Team 
3,4. 



Epitah : "As I lived I did try to make the best of my life before I died, and I promise you while I am dead I will make 
the best of what's ahead. 



68 






ROBERT TAYLOR 



144 West 144th St. 
New York, N.Y. 
Nickname: Too Cool, T.C. 
College: Boston College 
Occupation: Brain Child 
Entered Junior Class 1973 





Likes: Myself, money, football, my jokes, good 
music. Peaches, Monkeygomery, and 
Injun. 
Dislikes: Favoritism, South Boston people who 
don't wash. New York, All Jive's feet, 
feet, eight o'clock meetings, and 
Patty's boring science class. 
T.A. Biography: Football 3,4, Basketball 3,4, 
LaCrosse 3, Theater 3. 



Epitaph : "Women and poorly educated people are the most difficult to deal with." 



69 



V 



CLASS WILL 

Brian Rudy wills his alimony payments to Alphonso Kellam. 

David Rose wills his stink draws to Jose Serrano. 

Greg Carroll wills his clothes to the Thompson dump. 

Juan Coday wills his adoption papers to Ron Dumont. 

Archie Claytor just wills to leave. 

James Montgomery wills Nixon's jockstrap to John Quinn. 

Stanley Kiano wills his pygmy outfit to Pete Weiss. 

Calvin Reed wills his broken tooth to Tom the Chef. 

Wayne Gerrish wills his baggy pants to Harry Fenton. 

Steve Powell wills his fungi socks to Carmello Rivera. 

Robert Taylor wills his "Irish Spring" to Peaches Burnett, 

Eddie Neal leaves nothing because he has nothing to leave. 

Steve Scott wills his super coolness but no one would take it. 

Brian Feeney wills a bottle of "no-doz" to Bill Peck's next English class. 

Jonathan King wills his constitution for a Springtime fast to John Robinson, so he can 
loose weight. 

Tom McClure wills his hairdresser's telephone number to Joe Watts and Joe Lee. 

Mark Prentis wills his "I like Eddie Neal" button to Mugsie McGuire. 

George Rosado wills his "Kiss me I'm Irish" button to Tyrone Haskett. 

Larry Bavis wills his goofy golf hat to Mike Flaherty. 

Doug Marr wills his fine record at Thompson to Kevin Boyce. 

Eddie Donovan wills his moves to Mr. Pinto. 

Joe Stappen wills his cribbage ability to Taxi. 



70 



SUMMER READING LIST 



The Class of 1975 ever on the lookout to increase Its knowledge has suggested a 
summer reading list. This list will be made up of some of literature's finest novels. It is 
truly a fine collection, worthy to be in any of the great libraries of the world. 



"The Curing Of Insomnia" by William Peck and his entire English class. 

"How to Serve Murder-Burgers" by Thomas Klinepeter. 

"Having My Baby" by John "Injun" Horan. 

"Elliot Ness Is My Teacher" by Gerald Jordan. 

"The Playing Of The Grease-Comb" by John Quinn. 

"I Speak With Forked Tongue" by Rene J. St. Pierre. 

"How To Drive A Boat When You Can't See Over The Wheel" by Ronald Dumont. 

"How To Tailor High Water Pants" by David Handy. 

"How To Drive In Five Easy Lessons" by Douglas Paige. 

"The Man With The Steel Wool Chin" by Alan Willis. 

"How Not To Be Conned By A Thompson Student" by Alan November. 

"Lesson's In Duck Walking" by John Pinto. 

"The Life Of Leisure" by Harry Fenton. 

"I Really Like John Robinson" by Charles Baxter and Raymond Thomas. 

"The Effects Of A Beer Diet" by Robert Sullivan. 

"I Really Like Charles Baxter and Raymond Thomas" by John Robinson. 

"How To Develop A Charming Personality" by Peter Weiss. 

"Violence Is My Bag" by William Nelson. 



71 





The WINSLOW instead of the whaler. 



Chopping the ice to free the boat circa 1923. 




Fourth from the left is Ray Thomas, present Ass't 
Headmaster when he was a student on the island. 




'»'J^^vK»~MSto8«jt«Mt>v 



"B" Dorm under construction circa 1930. 





A boat boy is his summer white 
uniform about 1918. 



New Dorm under construction. 



72 




The Class of 1975 in 1971 . Can you recognize the ones who made it? 





Mr. and Mrs. Stiels, teachers in the forties. 



The school car in the early sixties. 




The 1935 Varsity Football Team. 

FIRST ROW: Willey, Burns, Millett, Goodwin, Jones, Littlejohn, and Beck. SECOND 

ROW: DeLorie, Parsons, Harris, Bean, and Richie. 



73 




Feeney 



Will the real Senior Class stand up and turn around. 







Would you let any of these babysit for your 14 year old daughter? 





EInumerounoand EInumeroduo 



j EInumerounoloadodestructorucko. 



74 







Congratulations are in order after the Homecoming game with 
Concord Academy. 



"Fifteen-two, fifteen-four,. 




Proof Captain Pete never really quit smoking. 



Football Captains and Coaches. 

FIRST ROW: Brian Feeney, Jonathan King, and Doug Marr. SECOND 

ROW: Doug Paige, John Robinson (Head Coach), and Dave Handy. 



75 





Practice in the Band Room, which is now the Art Room. 



John Ripley Morse, Bandleader 1860's. 













Senior Band in 1957. 



The Band drilling on the front lawn, 1947. 



^f- 



1866 



76 



SCHOOL BAND HISTORY 



One of the most distinctive extra-curricular activities of the Farm School had its inception in the year 
1857. It seems that twelve boys amused themselves and their schoolmates by creating musical sounds 
when singing through combs covered with tissue paper. Three other boys with violins soon joined the 
group and later a bass violin, saxhorn, coropean and drum were added to form the nucleus of what 
become, that same year, the first school band in America. 

Special room in the east wing of the Main Building was used for practice which was called "The Band 
Room." After the first year, a second hand set of band instruments was hired by the School and, with 
surprising rapidity, the band progressed from an amusing novelty to a well organized group of talented 
musicians. 

Two years after the "Comb Band" was started, the Farm School Band made its debut by leading the 
procession when the boys from Thompson's Island made their annual pilgrimage to Boston and paraded 
through its streets. This was the first public appearance of a school band in America. Later, new 
instruments were purchased by the School and through the years that followed the Farm School Band 
increased, not only in the number of participating musicians but in proficiency as well. 

A gigantic Peace Jubilee opened in Boston, June 15, 1869, in a huge Colosseum, capable of 
accomodating an orchestra of one thousand musicians, a chorus of ten thousand voices, and an audience 
of over fifty thousand people. The Farm School was invited to participate in this history making event. 

A goodly share of the credit for the success of the Farm School Band must go, not only to the boys but 
also to their Director of some fifty years, John Ripley Morse, brother of the Superintendent of the School. 
Many members of the Band later occupied positions with some of the finest musical organizations, 
including the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 



1934 




77 



s. 




Frank Tkacik and Mr. Thomas display sonne of the workmanship to come out of woodworking this year. 








Shuffleboard anyone? Circa 1952. 



Mr. Quinn, look where I found the CIA!" 



78 




Who says it never snows on the island? Blizzard of 1963. 




A! Grincavich and Jerry Jordan assist Tom Rooney and Frank Tkacik start down the front 
lawn. Archie Claytor, Mark Powell, and Calvin Reed look on. 





"Mr. Robinson? Why he happens to be the 
most handsome and intelligent person I've 
met in a long time." 




i * ,j^^^xw^^mm 






"Dave the Rave" 



YEARBOOK STAFF: 



Editor in Chief : Stephen Scott 
Business Manager: Brian Feeney 
Senior Editor: Archie Claytor 
Sports Editor: Robert Taylor 
Underclassmen Editor: Russell Smith 
Art: Ed Neal 
Faculty Advisor: John A. Robinson 



In 1945 they used a bobsled run down the banked Front Road. 



79 





"Btfghd muhkgyf oomkhj fgduv nkjio!! 



'Sure kid, now get in your room." 






\ 





'All right Shahbaz, what's that smell in your room?" 



"It's not dope, Igor, I was just rustlin' up a 
midnight snack." 



80 




Wanted for Misrepresentation of Current Events: Rene J. St. Pierre, 
5'2", 193 lbs. "eyeso' blue, cutchie, cutchie, cutchie, coo", Answers 
to the name of Reneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee! 



"Is this any way to run a dining room?" 



81 



X 




\ 




"It never rains in Southern California. 




"I wonder if the Headmaster from Andover sells donuts at recess?" 



82 



^1£ 



'"**"*3^^i^ 




"Would you hire this man to take your Algebra I final exam?" 




Papa Carter and George Rosado have at it with the Air Hockey Unit. 



83 





What do you expect? 
After all, the child and 
mother pictured know 
the yearbbook advisor 
well. 




84 




I would like to take this opportunity to thank a 
number of individuals for their help in putting 
this yearbook together. It is unfortunate that I 
cannot thank the senior class as a whole for all 
their cooperation. However, appreciation is 
extended to John Pinto, without whose expertise 
on layout this book never would have come out. 
Harry Fenton and Al Willis for photography are 
hereby thanked. Ann Weiss and Harry Fenton 
shall receive plaudits for help in typing copy. 
Thanks also go out to Archie Claytor, Brian 
Feeney, and Robert Taylor simply for doing their 
jobs as specified on the Yearbook Staff. 

At this point, I would also like to apologize to 
anyone I might have offended with my 
sometimes black sense of humor. I hope all will 
understand that these liberal sprinklings are an 
attempt to add a little humaness to an otherwise, 
usually dull publication. 

A special thank you to Mrs. Thomas, who for 
two months listened to me talk to myself and 
never once complained. 



'I seethe harbor lights. 




.and I'll raise you two blue chips." A Thompson student would never play for real money. 



85 




Mr. Douglas Paige 

Mrs. Mary Lou Shumski 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Devine 
Mr. William Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Manning 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Downs 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Thomas 

Mrs. Edelmira Rosado 
Mr. Al Grincavich 

Mrs. Phyllis Champagne 

TheTkacik Family 
Mr. Joseph Stappen 

Mrs. Beverly Doane 
- Mr. and Mrs. Walter Logue 
Mr. Alan C. November 

Mrs. Earnestine Kiano 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Pinto and 

Family 



Master Christopher Rowe Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baxter 

Mr. Paul Murphy 

Mr. Ralph M. Lindsey 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Claytor 

Mr. Harold W. Edwards 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Klinepeter 

Anonymous 

Mr. John F. Quinn 

Mr. William Peck 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Weiss and Pepper 

Mr. Ben Ames Williams, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Willis 

Mr. Frank White 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Prentis 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Tracy 

Mr. Michael Koumantzelis 



§ 



The Thompson Academy Yearbook would also like to thank those who contributed to the 
PATRON FUND, but whose names do not appear here becuase their contributions arrived after 
the book went to press. 



ht^^/K^V.^V^^-Kj^V.^V.^^It^rilt^O'^^^V.^yi^^V^yt.^V.^V.^V.^^ 



86 




COMPLIMENTS OF 
THREE FRIENDS 



87 




I 



MEETING HOUSE HILL 
CO-OPERATIVE BANK 
2250 DORCHESTER AVENUE 
689-2250 



88 



I 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

COLUMBIA POINT 

YACHT CLUB 



89 



S'v^/v^.^i^itjQ'yt^'^if^'^iit.^'v^rtt.^^^^^iu^^f^^i^^'vi^^v^^ 



WILLIAM M. BAILEY CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
44 SCHOOL ST. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
CALVIN PAGE BARTLETT 



E.B. GIVEN 

AND 
SONS, INC. 



90 




FEENEY'S SERVICE 

796 E. 7TH ST. 

SO. BOSTON, MASS. 



CITY POINT 






PHARMACY 
854 E. 4TH ST. 

SO. BOSTON, MASS. 



91 



X 



SNORTAP 



DaveZupofska 

Paul Wyatt 

David Womble 

Robert z"chico" White 

Paul Watts 

Richard Walters 

Kendall Walker 

Kevin Toler ^, 

David Swan 

Richard Spencer 

WilfredoSoto 

Thomas Rozene 

Tony Rinaldo 

Timothy Pratt 

Jeffrey Pratt 

Alvin Polo 

Phillip Pender 

Thomas Panniello 

Jose Palmarin 

James "Ozzie" Orton 

Edward "Coffeepot" Oneal 

John O'Brien 

David Norris 

Thomas Nicoletti 

Michael Nee 

William Michaud 

William McKenny 

John McGinnis 

Steven McFarland 

Donald McCarthy 

Gene Marechaux 

Robert Mahoney 

Dennis Mahoney 

Joseph Lupo 



Michael "Bambu" Lombardo 

Lawrence Lee 

Brian Lee 

Gerald Kilday 

James Kelley 

William Kelleher 

William Keating 

Coery Joyner 

Steven Joyce 

Michael Higgins 

Robert Guinto 

Robert Frechette 

Dale Francis 

John Feeney 

Mark Estes 

John Earner 

Michael Downey 

Kevin Donovan 

Louis DiFazio 

James DelValle 

Ronald Daphnis 

Ronald Danforth 

Robert Danforth 

John Cunniff 

Clyde Cross 

Robert "Mad Dog" Collins 

Brian Clarke 

John "Hector" Carter 

Ralph Capuzzo 

Bruce Berry 

Michael Benjamin 

Frank Battiato 

William "Skip" Arrigal 

John Schroth 



92 




BEST WISHES 

TO 

THE CLASS OF 1975 

FROM 

THE LOCAL CHAPTER OF 

ORGANIZED CRIME 



TO THE CLASS OF 1975 
"EAT GUANO AND DIE" 

FROM 

A FORMER CLASSMATE 

EXPELLED IN 1973 



"I just love Uncle Igor." 

—Taxi. 

"I learned lotsa new tricks." 
—Sam. 

"I wish I were a Kellogg's 

cornflake " — Pepper 




Here Igor demonstrates a 
new disciplining method. 



IGOR'S CANINE 
FINISHING SCHOOL 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN THE 
HIGHLANDS OF CENTRAL VIET NAM 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

QUASI MODO 



'>t^X^^<.^>^^C^^t^X^V^TC^X^^t^->C^^t^^C^%C^^t^V^^t^X,^lt^TV^X^X^V^^«^T<^Tt^^t^^t^T<^X^ 



93 



'v^ 



STUDENT BODY 



Dennis Arena 
Lawrence Bavis 
Kevin Boyce 
Timothy Buckley 
Gregory Bullock 
Karlton Burnett 
Louis Burns 
Paul Capeless 
Gregory Carroll 
Patrick Carter Jr. 
Richard Carter 
Archie Claytor 
Juan Coday 
Alan Davis 
George DelValle 
James Devine 
James Doane 
William Donald 
Edward Sonovan 
Mark Doucette 
Timothy Doucette 
Edward Downs 
James Elwell 
Brian Feeney 
Michael Flaherty 
Wayne Gerrish 
Tyrone Haskett 
Thomas Herlihy 
Edward Joyce 
Jose Joyner 
Alphonso Kellam 
Stanley Kiano 
Jonathan King 
Randall King 
Joseph Lee 
Walter Logue 
Thomas McClure 
Brian McDonough 
Michael McGrath 



281 D St. So Boston, MA 02127 

559 E. St. So Boston, MA 02127 

91 Maple St. Dorchester, MA 021 21 

76 Gates St. So Boston, MA 02127 

4917 Washington St. W. Roxbury, MA 02132 

2339 N. College Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19121 

102 Westminster Ct. Roxbury, MA 02119 
646 E. 5th St. So Boston, MA 02127 
639 E. 169 St. Bronx, NY 10456 

70 G.St. So Boston, Ma 021 27 
40HosmerSt. Mattapan, MA 021 26 
97 Ruthven St. Roxbury, MA 02121 
2833 Gunther Ave. Bronx, NY 10469 
217 Pearl St. Sommerville, MA 02145 
130 Columbia St. New York, NY 10002 
2 So. Hillside St. Assonett, MA 02702 
65 Newburg St. Roslindale, MA 02131 
350 K St. So Boston, MA 02127 
158Waterston Ave. Quincy, MA 02170 
150 Adams St. Dorchester, MA 021 22 
150 Adams St. Dorchester, MA 021 27 
45 Old Harbor St. So Boston, MA 021 27 
417 E. 7th St. So Boston, MA 02127 
1 Ross Place So Boston, MA 02127 
266 Dorchester St. So Boston, MA 021 27 
128 Bay St. Hull, MA 02045 
83 Harton Ave. New Rochelle, NY 10801 
705 E. 5th St. So Boston, MA 02127 
1 21 Old Harbor St. So Boston, MA 021 27 
28 Woodruff Way Mattapan, MA 02126 
323 Borden Ave. Trenton, NJ 08610 

103 Beverly Rd. Alington, MA 02174 
699 Lilly Pond Rd. Albany, GA 31701 
37 Arnold St. Revere, MA 02151 

170 Bowen St. So Boston, MA 02127 
395 E. 5th St. So Boston, MA o2127 
9 Jenkins St. So Boston, MA 02127 
861 E. Broadway So Boston, MA 02127 
20 Gates St. So Boston, MA 02127 



94 



DIRECTORY 



J 



Donald McGuire 
Dennis Manning 
Douglas Marr 
Peter Meeken 
Edward Milan Jr. 
James Montgomery 
Gerald Morancy 
Stephen Murphy 
Eddie Neal 
John Nee 
Daryl Payne 
Joseph Perry Jr. 
Mark Powell 
Stephen Powell 
Mark Prentis 
Mike Prentis 
Richard Quinn 
Calvin Reed Jr. 
Carmelo Rivera 
Thomas Rooney 
George Rosado 
David Rose 
Cavon Ross 
Edward Ruck 
Brian Rudy 
Paul Tyan 
Russell Smith 
Stephen Scott 
Jose Serrano 
Joseph Shahbaz 
Herbert Smith 
Joseph Stappen 
Gene Sullivan 
Robert Taylor 
Francis Tkacik 
Robert Tracy 
Michael Underwood 
Joseph Watts 
Louis Williams 



16 Grimes St. So Boston, MA 02127 
64 W. 7th St. So Boston, MA 02127 
438 Jerusalem Rd. Cohasset MA 02025 

1 38 Orton-Marotta Way So Bos. , MA 021 27 
925 E. Broadway So Boston, MA 02127 
131 St. Nicholas Ave. A. 11 E NY, NY 10026 
111 H.St. So Boston, MA 02127 
8 Central Close Auburndale, MA 02166 
8 Fidelis Way Apt 1 14 Brighton, MA 02135 
251 OCallaghanWaySo. Boston, MA 021 27 
234 Callender St. Dorchester MA 021 24 
286 E. St. So Boston, MA 02127 
32 Morrison St. Medford, MA 02155 
32 Morrison St. Medford, MA 02155 
592 E. 4th St. So Boston, MA 02127 
592 E. 4th St. So Boston, MA 02127 

17 Carrol St. Nashua, NH 03060 
Chesire County Tpk. Drewsville, NH 03604 
3 W. 192nd St. Apt 43 Bronx, NY 10468 

51 Gates St. So Boston, MA 02127 
140 Columbia St. Apt 4D NY, NY 10002 
87 W. Cottage St. Roxbury, MA02125 
54CopelandSt. Roxbury, MA 02119 
44 Pleasand Hill Ave Mattapan, MA 02126 
240 Adams St. Lowell, MA 01854 
600 E. 3re St. So Boston, MA 02127 
753 E. 118th St. Cleveland, OH 44108 
168 Hart St. Apt 34 Taunton, MA 02780 
81 Columbia Rd. Dorchester, MA 021 21 
253 Gushing St. Hingham, MA 02043 
731 E. 3rd St. So Boston, MA 02127 
76 W. Broadway So Boston, MA 02127 
339 K. St. So Boston, MA 02127 
144 W.I 44th St. NY, NY 10030 
642 E. 7th St. So Boston, MA 02127 
94 H. St. So Boston, MA 02127 
91 Hammond St. Roxbury, MA 021 20 
73 Harold St. Milton, MA 02186 

18 Montrose St. Roxbury, MA 021 19 



95 



-\ 



Dear Thompson Academy: 

Who am I? 
What am I? 
Why am I here? 
Which way do I turn? 
Where do I go? 
When will I learn? 

These are the questions I asked myself when I first come to Thompson. I am Wayne Gerrish. I am a 
student at Thompson Academy. I am here because I had messed up in past years. The direction I am 
now heading is towards college. When I get out of college I hope to help others as Thompson has 
helped me. I know this sounds strange, but I think I learned something here. Not just in class, but in 
life itself. I really like this school. Even though it's not the best one in the world, it's far from being the 
worst either. I am sorry to hear that the school has to close next year because I really think you could 
learn something if you wanted to. I will always remember Thompson as a stepping stone in my life. It 
helps to have John Quinn as a guidance counselor finding a college you can afford and will do well in. 
It helps to have people like John Robinson, Bill Peck, Doug Paige, Bill Nelson, and Dave Handy to sit 
down and explain things to you instead of just saying, do this, do that, and have it ready for class 
tomorrow. It is also nice to have Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Baxter around to talk to when times are 
especially hard. When you have two teachers out on the soccer field like Mr. Peck and Mr. Quinn, who 
don't know any more than you and me about the sport, but teach you something, then you've got to 
say that they are pretty good guys. 

THANK YOU TA, 
Wayne Gerrish 
Class of 1975 



Dear Wayne Gerrish : 

Thank you for the thank you. That alone has made my 161 year existence 

worthwhile. 

Sincerely, 
Thompson Academy 



-30- 



96 



K